News in Brief: McDonald’s May Have Intimidated Employees Into Voting GOP, and More

McDonald’s May Have Intimidated Employees Into Voting GOP

Ohio Democrats are calling for an investigation into the owner of 12 of the state’s McDonald’s restaurants, claiming he attempted to “intimidate” employees into voting for Republicans on election day, according to Raw Story. Employees received letters from owner Paul Siegfried with their paychecks urging them to vote for GOP candidates to ensure the safety of their own jobs. “If the right people are elected, we will be able to continue with raises and benefits at or above present levels. If others are elected, we will not,” the letter said, printed in the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Siegfried then listed the names of three GOP candidates for Senate, governor and House representative.

JFK Aide and Speechwriter Ted Sorensen Dies

A political heavyweight since his days as a speechwriter for President John F. Kennedy, Theodore Sorensen died Sunday at 82, according to The Wall Street Journal. Sorensen, born in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1928, had written some of Kennedy’s most memorable speeches, including his inaugural address and his promise of sending man into space. A year after Obama’s election in 2008, Sorensen was quoted as saying that the president’s speeches came across as “a little too well informed.”

Jon Stewart Delivers Impassioned Final Speech at Rally to Restore Sanity

With hundreds of thousands in attendance, Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert’s rally in Washington, DC, this weekend included comedy acts, musical performances and a touching final speech by the host. A video on Comedy Central shows Stewart telling his audience, “if we are to get through the darkness and back into the light, we have to work together.”

Corporations Hide Political Spending

According to The Nation, corporate interests are going to great lengths to hide their election spending from the public. By giving money to nonprofits and trade groups with inconspicuous names such as Americans for Job Security that really serve as shields for special interests, corporate donors are able to throw their weight behind a candidate without taking accountability for their spending. The recent Supreme Court ruling on Citizens United has helped enable this type of behavior by allowing for unlimited and anonymous corporate donations.

GOP Admits They May Have Lost Senate

Top Republican leaders admitted on Sunday that they could fall short of winning the Senate on Tuesday, McClatchy Newspapers reports. As Tea Party candidates like Joe Miller and Christine O’Donnell have begun to lose support from their base in recent weeks, Gov. Haley Barbour of Mississippi said, “I’m not predicting that we will get the majority this cycle.”