Watching the Rails: One Community’s Quest for Safety

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When fossil fuel polluters need a place to do their dirtiest and most dangerous work, they tend to locate their operations in places where they believe people have less power, often in low-income communities or communities of color. Faced with a deadly new threat, residents in one predominately African-American community are organizing their neighbors and allies from far and wide — building the power to take on a Fortune 500 company and complacent regulators.

Units at the Ezra Prentice Homes on Saturday, May 7, 2016, in Albany, New York. (Photo: Earthjustice)Units at the Ezra Prentice Homes on Saturday, May 7, 2016, in Albany, New York. (Photo: Earthjustice)

Leatha, 13 years old, gives her mom, Angela Scott, a kiss outside their home at the Ezra Prentice Homes. (Photo: Earthjustice)Leatha, 13 years old, gives her mom, Angela Scott, a kiss outside their home at the Ezra Prentice Homes. (Photo: Earthjustice)

The Ezra Prentice Homes are located next to the railroad tracks where oil tank rail cars travel. (Photo: Earthjustice)The Ezra Prentice Homes are located next to the railroad tracks where oil tank rail cars travel. (Photo: Earthjustice)