Israeli Law to Force-Feed Prisoners Labeled “Torture” by Doctors

Israel’s parliament passed a controversial law authorizing the force-feeding of hunger-striking Palestinian prisoners, drawing swift condemnation from the country’s medical association, which called the practice torture.

The government-backed bill was introduced in response to cases in which Palestinian prisoners have gone on prolonged hunger strikes to protest jail conditions and their detention without trial, sometimes winning early release.

The legislation, passed 46-40 in the 120-member Knesset, authorizes a district court judge to approve force-feeding of a prisoner who in the opinion of a doctor is in imminent danger of death or severe and irreversible disability.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu last year cited force-feeding at the US-run Guantanamo Bay detention camp to bolster the government’s case for the practice, in which liquid nourishment is pumped in tubes run through prisoners’ noses into their stomachs.

Internal Security Minister Gilad Erdan, who sponsored the bill, said after it passed that “hunger strikes by imprisoned terrorists have become a tool for attempts to pressure the state of Israel.”

“We must not reach a situation in which a prisoner who poses a public threat will be freed because the state did not have the ability to save him from death and is compelled to release him,” Erdan said.

Khader Adnan, a Palestinian prisoner who had been on a hunger strike for 55 days to protest his detention without charges, was released this month by the Israeli authorities because of fears that his possible death could trigger widespread unrest.

Israel holds more than 5,600 Palestinians in its jails, 391 of them without charges or trial, according to the Israel Prison Service.

Dr. Leonid Eideleman, chairman of the Israeli Medical Association, called passage of the force-feeding bill “a black day in the annals of Israeli legislation.” He said his group would instruct doctors not to cooperate with the procedure.

“Force-feeding is torture, doctors must not participate in torture, and Israeli doctors will not participate in torture,” Eidelman said, adding that his group would challenge the law in the Israeli Supreme Court.

Physicians for Human Rights-Israel, an advocacy group, said the new law “pushes the medical community to severely violate medical ethics for political aims, as dark regimes have done in the past,” and it urged doctors to “refuse to serve as a medical fig leaf for torture.”

There was also harsh criticism from Palestinian officials.

Hanan Ashrawi, a member of the executive committee of the Palestine Liberation Organization, called the legislation a “flagrant violation of international law and conventions,” including a 1991 declaration by the World Medical Association calling force-feeding “inhuman and degrading treatment.”